Are Varsity Jackets Still a Thing?

By: Emma Glezen/Content Editor

For years, high schools have given their high school students varsity jackets.  Then as more time passed, the amount of students who received a jacket decreased, from all of the high school students to only student athletes.  Recently, in past years at Blue Ridge High School only the student athletes who have achieved two varsity letters could receive their varsity jacket.  Mr. Scott Summers says that as the new athletic director at Blue Ridge, “We require that students have at least participated in three seasons of varsity sports and have received varsity letters for each.”

Along with the amount of high school students who could get the jackets, the quality of the jackets have also declined.  Years ago, they used to be nice letterman jackets, that were heavy, had no hoods, and had your name and high school’s logo on it.

Old Letterman Jacket: calibre apparel

Unfortunately now, they have been degraded to basically rain jackets. That aren’t very thick and they only have your name on them, not the school’s logo nor what sport you played.  They are like any other jacket you could go out and buy in JCPenny’s or Dick’s Sporting Goods. According to Mr. Summers, former athletic director, Jill Hoffman, made this decision thinking, “more people would wear them.” Though some people do not feel that was the right decision, Mr. Summers does not plan on going back to letterman jackets for that same reason.

Current Varsity Jacket: columbia.com

Many seniors and juniors are still in need of these jackets and Mr. Summers is on the hunt for those who meet his criteria and are still in need of a jacket before graduation at the end of the year.

Emma Glezen is a senior at Blue Ridge High School and this is her first year in Journalism. She plays volleyball but, loves to watch baseball. She cherishes her family and two dogs, Jett and Gypsy. In her free time, she enjoys being outdoors, spending the time hunting and fishing. She also hopes to further her education at Penn State Hazleton to be a physical therapist assistant.